Recognition For Life

When I first started using Twitter I was advocating for NLD (Nonverbal Learning Disability) to be put on the DSM5 and to be recognized by the Center of Disease Control (CDC), and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD). These are the WHO’s WHO list of health and disability. I wanted a community for support, testing, research, and schools to understand and make accommodations for Nonverbal Learning Disability. This would be an inclusive environment with recognition from home, to school, in the community, and our society for NLD and other unique learning styles with extraordinary minds. I want people to LEARN, LIVE, and SURVIVE. I want people to understand and know their QUALITY OF LIFE.

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In a recent article by NPR, Autism Is Underestimated in South Korea, it may be more common than one thinks.  Autism is Mr. Umbrella of the Spectrum.  These neurological disorders are global and are being overlooked. At least Autism is recognizable and has a National Autism Society for inclusion. NLD, on the other hand, is unrecognized by the DSM4 and it leaves it no room for being a credible neuropsychological disorder.  Those who have been diagnosed with NLD Syndrome have unintentional behaviors and is not emotionally disturbed.

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Whether it is Nonverbal Learning Disability (NLD), Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD), on the list or not, I am going for RECOGNITION FOR A HUMAN LIFE. The new text message for RECOGNITION FOR LIFE is ESBL We, the parents, our children/adults EAT, SLEEP, BREATH, and LIVE these disorders and have earned our HONORARY DEGREE.

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This text blog message is dedicated to the American Psychiatric Association(APA), Dr. Regier and his task force team.

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NLD Mom/cancer survivor

Super Bowl Flare Up NLD

We are counting down the days to the Superbowl. Emotions are running high. Our tempers are flaring up. Americans go berserk when competitive sports are involved.

Can I have a spotlight down here, please?  I just need to take a closer look at some of the players.  Thank you.  Maybe this will shine the light on why our team players are having these outbursts of anger, and explosive behaviors.

Leroy, get over here and stop acting like you own the team.  I know you don’t do well with criticism.  You upset a few of your teammates when you get loud and you were in their face.  Don’t be upset if they change the color of your shoes. You look like a Demanding Diva to the coach and the owner.

Let’s get one thing straight.  Leroy is not emotionally disturbed.  He has some negative behaviors but he is not a behavior problem.  In the Sunday paper, it had Leroy Syndrome painted as an arrogant a-hole.   He is not arrogant and he wasn’t having a bad hair day.  Leroy Syndrome is NLD.  Leroy does Leroy.  He does himself.  Leroy does have other special interests.

It appears that Leroy may have a know-it-all attitude.  He has trouble with authority figures and has a problem with identifying who is in charge.  So coach Asperger, just explains to him in a nice calm voice that the team is not his.  Sorry Coach, I forgot you have the same problem with a loud voice.  We will find someone else to do it.  Leroy does better with praises than with criticism.  Tell Mike Ditka this is good for Leroy’s self-esteem.  What is wrong with positive feedback?  We all know Leroy needs a lot of praises.

Bring that bucket over here.  Is that the understanding bucket?  That’s the wrong bucket.  Get it out of here!

Tell Dwayne and Boo Boo don’t get mad.  I know he talks loud.  The other players Asperger,  Autism, and ADHD talks loud also.  He did not mean to sound threatening.  Leroy has a right hemisphere brain disorder.  He is unable to comprehend changes in voices and body language.  The non-verbal element of his speech is disturbed.  Leroy doesn’t have rhythm.  Literally.  That’s in his voice and tone of his speech.  He can’t read the facial expressions which play a part in his loud voice.  Calmly say to him, lower your voice.  He just needs to be cued in.

Leroy would you tell them that those tennis shoes are not your lucky piece charm.  “Yes, I have a hard time adapting to change and the coach did not let me know ahead of time.”  Leroy, is there anything else you would like to tell us?  “Well, the shoes are important to me.  I have a difficult time with what is relevant or irrelevant.  I talk off task or get away from the subject.  When people don’t explain themselves and they ask me did I understand, I say no.”  Well, you heard it firsthand from Leroy Syndrome.  This will help you understand why people tell you NO.

To the owner, you have a manual on how the game is played.  It is time to get a manual on Leroy Syndrome.

This one is dedicated to Barack and Michelle Obama.  Understanding NO is important.